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TEC37 E03: Reopening in the "New Normal"

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Many organizations made a sudden shift to a remote workforce. In reopening, there are a handful of approaches companies are considering and implementing. In this episode, our Cloud, IoT and Collaboration experts speak to the IT considerations as companies move through the hybrid work environment and manage occupancy limitations, rotating work shifts, workers who remain work-from-home (WFH) even as others return to office campus.

Please view transcript below.

 

Robb Boyd:

What kind of things could technology be doing to help us get back to whatever the new normal needs to be? Welcome to TEC37, the podcast for technology education and collaboration, brought to you by World Wide Technology. My name is Robb Boyd. Well, today we are talking about reopening in the new normal, whatever your normal might look like, and really what is happening at that intersection of business and technology. As you can see, we have some experts here, and this isn't even all the experts. These are just some of the experts that World Wide Technology offers, but we're going to get a taste of what type of help can be provided not only from these fine people, but also the people that they have continued to learn from, because we're all doing this together. So first though, let's introduce everybody. Arnel, let's start with you. Can you give us your title and a little bit about yourself?

Arnel Sinchongco:

Hi, how are you doing, Robb?

Robb Boyd:

Good.

Arnel Sinchongco:

My name is Arnel Sinchongco. I am the Multi-Cloud Consulting Practice Manager here at World Wide Technology. I have had a pretty lengthy career in IT, about 25 plus years, and honestly, I've had a variety and held a variety of jobs throughout my career, pretty much basically everything you can think of across the realm of IT.

Robb Boyd:

Excellent. Well, thank you for joining us, Arnel. And let's now go to Joe. Joe, what are you responsible for there?

Joe Berger:

Yeah. Hey gang, Joe Berger. I am the Senior Director for the Digital Workspace Practice here at World Wide Technology. I've been at World Wide for about seven years, but my career, I've been in and out of conferencing and unified communications for about the past 20 years or so. Based in St. Louis, and I'm coming to you all today from my home office. Thanks for having me.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah, that's our current normal for all of us. It's been a lot of this. All right. So moving on now, Kait, it's your turn. Tell us about yourself.

Kait Miller:

Sure. My name is Kait Miller. I'm a Business Development Manager with World Wide Technology, and I've been in the IT industry for about 12 years, focused on delivering business outcomes for customers. My focus area is on video analytics.

Robb Boyd:

Perfect. Oh, that's going to be interesting. Okay. Thank you, Kait, appreciate that. Now, Charlie, tell us a little bit more about Charlie.

Charlie Lawhorn:

Hey guys, Charlie Lawhorn. I'm one of the Chief Digital Advisors here at World Wide. Based out of st. Louis, been in all types of tech software, hardware. My team on the digital side spends a lot of time with our customers helping build out new customer or employee experiences. A lot of times, that's wrapped around with applications that we help develop and deliver, to solve some of their challenges.

Robb Boyd:

Perfect, perfect. Well, I think this may fit Kait and Charlie first. We've got a lot to cover in our 37 minutes that we always promise that we're going to try and keep things to here, but rest assured, and we'll cover this more at the end, you guys have all also been very busy putting together a wealth of resources beyond not only more video, but more from your peers, as well as written materials, checklists, all kinds of very helpful information around these topics, because there's no end to the depth that we're going to be touching on here.

Robb Boyd:

But let's start with Charlie and Kait, perhaps. When it comes to reopening, and I know that there's as many opinions as there are ideas about when this may happen, and I think in general, it feels like something is just happening ongoing, but what are you guys seeing? You're working with customers on a constant basis. You're advising as well as learning. What would you say about this? Charlie, I'll start with you.

Charlie Lawhorn:

Gosh, reopening is a pretty broad topic, as you mentioned. Depending on where you are in the world and what type of industry you're in, reopening is very different. A lot of the people on this call will talk about it from either the customer side and trying to figure out how to get your customers back into your offices, your buildings, your facilities. Some of our team members will talk about how to get your employees back, and will talk through some of those. I spend most of my time on the customer side, so a ton of time talking to retailers, hospitality organizations, restaurants, sporting event venues, trying to figure out how to get crowds back into kind of what is the next phase of normal.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. And so, Kait, and I meant to specify this a bit more, because I think one way to look at this maybe is public places, and trying to take a look at what things may look like, but Kait, what are your thoughts?

Kait Miller:

Yeah, I think the two main areas that our customers are going to need to overcome are going to be employee safety, ensuring that their employees feel confident to come back into a workplace, and then customer confidence. So how do you show the customer that you are taking all of the necessary steps to ensure your employee safety and their safety while they reengage with you?

Robb Boyd:

Well, and I'll open this up to anybody that wants to jump in, but what do you guys think? I mean, what's the current thought? And because I'll give you permission to say that your minds can of course, be changed within the next few days, if not weeks, as things continue to evolve, but what are the things we need to be thinking about when it comes to reopening as a business where it intersects with technology?

Charlie Lawhorn:

Gosh, I'll jump in real quick. I think it's about space, right? I mean, most of this is about distance and space, and helping people feel safe within whatever their personal boundaries for space are, and I think figuring that out is one of the biggest challenges that every business has, is how to manage space.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. Well, and I also wonder, I think are we seeing a difference in terms of... It feels like some businesses have already done things that they didn't know they could do, because we were just all forced into it. I wonder, Joe, could you describe kind of what was it like just to kind of set this up correctly? We went from a hundred miles an hour, business as usual, to a whole new reality, and how are things normally handled when we make these kinds of changes in a business?

Joe Berger:

Yeah, we jumped to this new way of working very quickly. It's funny, as we started going through these types of topics, Charlie, Arnel, Kait, and myself and a number of others on the team, we looked at this in a number of ways, right? So way one was get everybody home as quickly as you can, get your employees at home, make sure IT could keep the lights on, and how could you help your end consumer or your end patient as quickly as possible? Wave two became that are we optimizing that? That work experience, are we giving that end consumer or patient sort of that... Can they still do business with us? I think most organizations had a remote worker policy somewhat in place, but maybe 20 or 30% of the organization, as they had to go to 80, 90, 100% of the organization, that's a pretty significant shift. And so, a lot of companies had to readjust very quickly.

Joe Berger:

I think what's happening now is customers or businesses are starting to say, "Okay, what is my policy for going back, and do I even need to go back?" We're finding a lot of organizations are saying, "You know what? I didn't think I could do this, and now that I have been in this situation, it actually works. And so, maybe 40% of my organization actually doesn't go back into the office." But it's going to vary, I think by industry, by country, by city potentially, depending upon how the virus ebb and flows, I'm not a medical expert, so I don't know. I can't tell you when that's going to happen, but you might have some organizations that have to go back a step, depending upon if there's a big outburst in a certain city. And so, customers and businesses are learning through this new norm, and they're all trying to figure out what is their posture and if they [inaudible 00:07:49] right now.

Robb Boyd:

Why don't we double down on health care a bit here? So I'm curious, what are the things that health care has learned? I mean, obviously there's first responder types that have been buried, but I think there's also a reality that from a health care perspective, it's not just about hospitals, it's not just about urgent care, it's also about the fact that as life goes on, maybe some of us are fortunate enough to be able to work at home, but we still got to see doctors. My kids still see a doctor, but they're seeing them differently now. I don't know. What are your thoughts on whether or not things are going to... What kind of things will stick, versus what kind of things should we be looking to see from a health care perspective?

Joe Berger:

Yeah.

Arnel Sinchongco:

Well-

Joe Berger:

Go ahead, Arnel.

Arnel Sinchongco:

Oh, I was just going to jump in. I do have a little bit of experience and background in the health care industry in my career. So what I can give you is a perspective that I have had in the years past. So health care organizations, we're really focusing and we're really targeting capabilities, remote capabilities, remote care, telemedicine, and so forth. And while that was a goal and an initiative for health care industries, even in the past 10 years, it has become even exacerbated, now that they realize that the remote capabilities, that the remote patient care, especially in rural areas, is more important than ever.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. And you know what I've discovered from my part, is that I actually, one little thing that I like is there's some simple things that I'm glad I've kind of been forced to move to telehealth. If I need to just get a quick update on something that the doctor normally would want me to come all the way in for, and book, and I've got to take time off from work and all those kinds of things. So I think there are benefits, but obviously, there's some things that just can't be replaced.

Robb Boyd:

What other thoughts about... Joe, you'd mentioned... Or not Joe, I'm sorry, Charlie, you'd mentioned sports teams when you were talking a little bit earlier. I think we're all looking forward to sports coming back, because that's a big... Even if we can't join them physically there, I would like to at least have some televised stuff, if the athletes are going to be able to be safe. But yeah, just so as we talk about what that normal may look like, what kind of things do we need to consider preparing for something when we're not even sure how to prepare for it? What kind of things might you recommend?

Charlie Lawhorn:

Yeah, we're spending a lot of time with NFL, NBA, MLS, you name it, the major teams, just trying to think about crowd control, and as I said earlier, kind of space management. So how can people get into the facilities faster, easier, with less lines, less queuing? How can they, once they're in, maybe order more from their seats and bypass the line, not stand in large groups? How can we use technology, digital signage, things like that to route them different directions or to manage which way they go to the concessions, or which way they go to the restrooms, or when they're exiting, exit this way, don't go that way, just to try and ease the strain. And I think Kait said it well, to give people confidence that the venues are trying to protect the fans, the players as well, but a lot of my time is really spent on trying to help them get fans back into the facilities, and what tech can they use to spread people out and make sure they stay as safe as possible.

Kait Miller:

And I would add to that too, Charlie, I think it's worth just taking a look at all the different things that happen when somebody attends a game like that. So if you go through the last time you attended a sporting event, first it's entering. So how do you get people in, like you said. Then it's sitting at your seat, then it's needing to use the lavatory, then it's wanting to order food, and just kind of making a checklist of all those different things that you need to account for. Creating, like you said, digital signage to tell folks when it's their turn to maybe do one of those things, and then utilizing that directionality to ensure that you're not going to have a chokepoint in that location.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah.

Charlie Lawhorn:

Yeah, and Kait... Oh, sorry.

Robb Boyd:

You have a security background too, I was going to say. Chokepoints, That sounds very security oriented to me, in terms of... And we're just reducing friction, right? We just don't want people queuing up, and which is something I would say sports teams were somewhat already focused on beforehand, it just has a different level of urgency and a different kind of reason for being. Who was jumping in there? I'm sorry.

Charlie Lawhorn:

I was just going to say, and Kait with your background in video, using things like video to monitor, and use the data and the analytics to understand the patterns of the crowd, and to deploy either pop-up retail, or maybe security in certain areas. So, using tech to also not just manage kind of the retail and the buying experience, but how do I staff things appropriately also?

Robb Boyd:

Yeah, that's a big point. I think we forget that cameras are more than just about the visuals, but they're actually sensors, and they need to be treated as such. They generate data that can be very useful for making better decisions, or for controlling certain things, and it may have nothing to do with visually looking at something constantly, especially when it comes to, I think you guys work with the Meraki cameras quite a bit. I've got one in here, tracking to make sure my kids aren't making off with any of my own home office stuff. We all have our own challenges with our teenagers, I'm sure, if we have teenagers. But regardless, okay. So let's talk about also the office space. Many of us, if we're not working from home, we're working from an office, it feels like there's been a lot of changes here. What kind of things do you think are happening from that perspective?

Joe Berger:

Yeah. So I'll take the first stab at that. So we're talking to a lot of customers right now about this, and they've all got different stances, because if you think about an office, the office is different things to different types of departments, and personas and so forth. So some people might have to plan for opening up a manufacturing plant, some might have to plan for opening up a corporate headquarters, others might be a shared tenant in a large building. And so, the way you're going to bring those people in are going to be much different, depending upon what that scenario is. We've had a lot of businesses start asking us around, well, do they do thermal scanning, or do they build an app that you have to answer five questions every morning before you're even allowed to get access into that office?

Joe Berger:

I think the key thing here is understanding, really the day in the life of those personas to figure out what is the best solution for them. Are they going into an environment where they have to share an elevator ride with other businesses? How are they going to handle mass transit? How are those people actually getting to the office? So it's one thing to talk about the experience of what happens when you sit in that actual seat, but there's a lot of other things we now have to consider even prior to even getting to that seat, that a lot of organizations are looking at, and a lot of them are still kind of questioning what is the right way to do this, what's our stance? And as well, and something else that Charlie and I have gotten involved in a lot of times, is how does HR and legal have to think about that? Is it a privacy concern when you start asking people how you're feeling every morning?

Robb Boyd:

Yeah.

Joe Berger:

And so, it's a whole new world to try to understand all these ramifications, and make sure that you're, number one, following your corporate policy, but also making sure your employee's happy and they're not scared to do it.

Robb Boyd:

Arnel, I see you nodding your head a little bit there. Do you have some additional commentary there?

Arnel Sinchongco:

Yeah, I do, a little bit. Thinking about everyone going back, a lot of the questions that I hear from customers when I speak with them lately, is as they start to go back to the office and there is this new normal is, how do I manage? How do I know what the patterns are of where people are congregating? So this is where a lot of technologies come into play that maybe these organizations have never thought about, like was mentioned with regard to thermal cameras, potentially, maybe IOT devices, maybe some Bluetooth low energy devices, that kind of give the organization some sort of picture or view of where their people are going to, with regard to geographical location, pinging, and so forth. So along with that is how do you make sense of that data of where people are gathering? So companies who never thought about artificial intelligence and maybe machine learning capabilities, are now starting to look at that as a viable opportunity.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah.

Joe Berger:

Yeah. And Rob, a great example of that that we're starting to see, especially if you think about going to the office, a lot of times, you're spending time in a meeting room, right? So you're still on a lot of conference calls. Well, if your conference room was built for 10 people, your new stance is you probably can only have five people in that room. Well, how do you ensure that sixth person isn't coming in? And so, it's looking at things like the camera in the room that can now track how many people are in there, and maybe it's giving you a notification, "Hey, you're at capacity for the room now," or maybe, "This room was clean two hours ago, and you need to wait until the next cleaning comes in," things like that. And so, we're currently looking at a lot of those types of technologies to kind of help people, but at the end if it, also make sure that they're following their new corporate policies to do all that stuff.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. I want to ask, what kind of things can someone be doing right now with so much uncertainty, to kind of plan for what's possible? Would you say that a lot of your... I know sometimes we have customers that are very on board with pushing the envelope with technologies and such like this, and they're fun to work with because they're usually pushing us, but you probably have some other customers that are coming to you, I would assume customers can come to you guys and go, "I'm not sure what to do," "Here's what we have if you're not already aware of it," because you probably are. But I don't know, are you making recommendations for customers about what they could do right now to plan for that whenever starts happening again?

Joe Berger:

Yeah. One of the things we do a lot for our customers, we'll actually sit down and do workshops with them, because like I mentioned, depending upon what type of industry, what city, what country, they're all going to have sort of different challenges that they have to deal with. And so, it really takes sitting down with them for a few hours, and we do this all virtually, it's sitting down and kind of whiteboarding, what are they tasked with? What are their personas that they're trying to get back in, or what is their policy for working from home? How do we kind of help map this out for them so that it gives them a better picture based on what their needs are, not the needs of 15 other customers too.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. Kait, I'm curious you mentioned more about talking about the cameras, and the analysis and the stuff that can be done.What are you seeing in terms of people being accepting of that kind of thing in terms of, is this something that's being explored, or is this something you feel like you have to push on a little bit more to make people aware?

Kait Miller:

Yeah, that's a great question. I think this is something that's being heavily explored by our customers, pretty regularly being pulled into conversations where customers are asking us to just give them an overview of what the capabilities are, how can machine learning and AI help them overcome the challenges that they're facing in the world as it sits today. Maybe they need sensors, maybe they need cameras, maybe they need a combination of both, maybe they need some thermal cameras, but they also need some AI. And then how do they future-proof that solution, so that if there's a regional outbreak, it's flexible enough to roll back, but also if we get a vaccine for this, is this an investment that they're going to be able to utilize to deliver business outcomes in the future as well?

Robb Boyd:

Interesting. That's good thoughts, right? Because it's not about just solving what's immediately in front of your face, but also thinking about long term, what's that going to bring to us? So Arnel, I'm curious about how companies can continue to evaluate where they are and where they're going to go. What else would you say about that?

Arnel Sinchongco:

Yeah. So this is going to come from my consultative aspect, right?

Robb Boyd:

Sweet.

Arnel Sinchongco:

I'm going to put my consultation hat on at this point. So, there are a lot of capabilities and a lot of technologies that organizations can use to help them be flexible and be agile in this new normal, because quite frankly, when this COVID thing hit and they had to pivot right away, a lot of organizations realized really how ill-prepared they were for rapid transition. So going back in the new normal, you really have to take a look at what the business wants to accomplish. I know we talk about a lot of things so far with regard to use cases and capabilities, but it really is about that transformation that an organization is going to need to go through. And in order be successful in that transformation, you really need to plan out that company strategy.

Arnel Sinchongco:

Base your technical and your strategies on the business goals. So what are your business drivers? What are you trying to accomplish? And once we can provide that synergy between the IT and business goals, then we can create an appropriate strategy to identify the gaps in the roadmap for technologies and initiatives that the company will undertake, to help them balance that new normal, agility versus continued continuity of business, and even disaster recovery capabilities in an event like COVID.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. I tell you what guys, because I don't want to miss this, and I want to spend plenty of time on it. One of the objectives we had for today was just to scratch the surface about this, and introduce each one of you, and you're just a subset of quite a few people that I've noticed when I was going through the series that you've already prepared and is already published at wwt.com on the platform, I think we call it, and that's where we're going to encourage everybody to go.

Robb Boyd:

But I wonder, I'm going to start with Charlie. I wonder, just talking about World Wide Technology resources and how people engage with you, I'm just curious from each one of you, you each represent a little bit of a different expertise, but how are people engaging with you right now, and what is it like? You've got a lot of smart peers you can bring in to continue to kind of expand the knowledge base and expand the opportunities, but yet, in a way that makes sense, it feels like, for how customers would actually begin to solve problems. But Charlie, what are your thoughts on that?

Charlie Lawhorn:

Classically, most of the IT organizations of the Fortune 1000, 2000, they kind of know who World Wide are, so that the CIOs, the IT executives are used to talking to us about these types of solutions. Over the last few years, we've built out business consulting organizations around big data, and cloud, and security, and a bunch of other areas, my area is digital, where we've really started working more with the line of business. And Joe mentioned some of the discussions we're having with heads of HR, heads of digital employee experience, head of facilities type capabilities, because the line of business people are now reaching out trying to find tech to bring into the organization as well, of course, supported by IT many times, but they're trying to solve this as well. And so, how they reach out to us is really, Joe mentioned kind of workshops or assessments, or a quick hit, how can we spend a few hours, look at what tools do they have in place, can we leverage those first, right? It's not always about buying new things.

Robb Boyd:

Good point.

Charlie Lawhorn:

How can we leverage what you have? How can we add to what you have? I think it was Kait who mentioned making sure there's continuity, that whatever we add has value beyond this. We're not just applying duct tape to the solution, we're trying to actually solve this problem, but make sure that your investment pays off long term. So our consulting teams, our services organization has been tremendously busy spending time with customers, evaluating where they are, where they want to go, as Arnel said, and how do we apply the right tools? I hate to say tech, because sometimes it's not tech. Sometimes it's labels, physical signage, it's banisters and ropes, and those types of things woven into solving this problem. It's not always a tech solution that we're recommending, even though we're a tech organization.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah, no, that's a great point. And I'm glad you brought that up, because one of the things I love about you guys, it's also not about a certain manufacturer, being that I came from working for many years as a manufacturer, where I could always describe any problem in terms of how my company is going to solve it for you specifically, and you guys aren't forced into anything like that. In fact, you're very good about bringing in whatever is necessary, even if it's not a technology, to say this is the easiest and most beneficial way to get on top of something quickly. Kait, as we're going around the horn, how are people interfacing with you in your expertise, and anything you'd recommend?

Kait Miller:

Yeah, absolutely. So for me with the video analytics, like I mentioned, we're often coming in as an advisor to start to just talk about the art of the possible, and what can be accomplished with cameras, how it can be accomplished, what that difficulty is going to be. There may be something that is very easy to do on the surface, but if it's going to take 200 cameras to do it, maybe there's a better way to accomplish and achieve that same outcome in a different way. So it's really talking through that art of the possible with the customer, and to Charlie's point, understanding their strategy and understanding what combination of technology and analytics needs to be brought to the table, in order to accomplish their short-term and long-term goals.

Robb Boyd:

Perfect. Perfect. Arnel, you mentioned you had little bit of background in health care, and some other things that you're bringing to this, but that's really what all of you bring in, some level of additional benefit. In fact, as I was diving into the resources that you guys provide, I've seen each of you in different formats as you were providing advice, and that was just pre-captured advice, not the custom consultative stuff that you do, but you guys have doctors on call, so to speak, or you have very good expertise in certain areas. So it's not as if you're just making stuff up as you go along, you guys have really brought in a lot, but I don't know. Any final points on how to engage, Arnel?

Arnel Sinchongco:

Yeah. The way we engage with our customers nowadays has really been very different. Just to let you know, I used to be a customer of World Wide's, prior to my career here at World Wide. So I experienced how World Wide engaged with customers before, and World Wide has that reputation of being a very viable VAR or reseller of products and technologies, but what has really transformed and changed in the organization, from my perspective coming in here, is that consultative aspect, where when now we engage with customers, it's not about, "Hey, what product or technology can you help me deploy in my environment?" but it's more, "How can you help me improve my business?" And through the consultative, through the technology SMEs that we do have on staff here, we are able to provide that end to end service to our customers, from strategy and vision, and bring that all the way through to deployment, and even ongoing management and optimization.

Arnel Sinchongco:

So we really have that capability to help customers not only understand how and where they need to go, or how we can help them get where they need to go, but we can also provide that continuity all the way through teaching them how to do it, how to manage that environment, because it is likely going to be a new environment for them. Because really, I come from the multi-cloud consulting team, right? And to World Wide, multi-cloud consulting is more than just public clouds. It's more about being cloud smart, and what the combination is of various platforms that you can use, whether it's on prem private data center, whether it's a colo environment, or whether it's public clouds, or any combination of the above, we help customers identify what those best solutions are, and we help them develop strategies that will help meet the business needs.

Robb Boyd:

Well, that's excellent. And I also like your focus there on what I kind of loosely refer to as day two operations. What do you do, if you have put in something new, whether it be anything from a strategy, simply to a plan, to actual new technology or something, there's always the adoption and reality of making sure that this stuff continues to add value, and it meets your expectations, based on what you initially thought. Well, I tell you what Joe, I like what you were talking about with the waves, because I think that's easy to understand. I have trouble picking which wave I'm on at any given moment in time, it feels like. But as we wrap things up, I wonder if you can finalize for us, where should people go for information? How should they engage? What is the ideal stuff to be aware of at this point in time?

Joe Berger:

Yeah, great question. So I think the starting point right now, and I think a couple of us brought up earlier, our new platform, wwt.com, we've been sort of on our own journey for the past year or so. As we've really done digital transformation, like a lot of our customers have done, we try to convert ourselves so that our customers that we deal with can work with us differently, rather than flying into St. Louis and getting into a lab that way, there's a lot more on demand labs you can go through through our platform, or get thought leadership, or interact with our engineers.

Joe Berger:

So, prior to COVID we were going down this path, I'd say COVID really accelerated that digital push. And then the thing that I think we found as you talk about how to interact with us, we had to become very digital and remote too, at the same time, on how we interact with our own customers. So we found new ways to engage with our customers on a day-to-day basis, whether that's turning on video, like we're on right now, and I know the majority of World Wide is on video calls quite a bit, but then it's also finding new tool sets to do things like ideation, and whiteboarding, and different ways of interacting.

Joe Berger:

And so, I think we've been able to kind of evolve very quickly, and we're trying to make it easier to do business with us, and that's part of the reason why we use our platform, is to just make it easy to work with us. We don't want to make it so friction [inaudible 00:30:26]. I know the new model's frictionless, but we want to reduce that friction so that when you are working with us, it doesn't seem like it's such a hard task. We turn on cameras, we build trust, we interact. We're trying not to lose what we had prior when we used to see each other more face to face. We want to try to carry over a lot of that experience, because to the point about the waves, who knows how long we're going to be in this. And so, we still want to have that real good partnership with our customers, and our vendors, and our partners out there. And so, we're constantly trying to get better at this remote experience and collaboration, so that we don't miss a beat, and we can still work with all of our great customers out there.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. General question to everybody, as we wrap things up here. Have you guys all had experiences where people you never thought you'd be interacting with on video, maybe it's in your family, maybe it's people you work with and you're like, "Oh, look who's getting better at video."

Joe Berger:

Yeah.

Robb Boyd:

Isn't it amazing?

Charlie Lawhorn:

Yes.

Robb Boyd:

I think it's-

Arnel Sinchongco:

Parents.

Robb Boyd:

Yeah, parents.

Joe Berger:

People will turn the camera on finally. Yeah. [inaudible 00:31:32]

Robb Boyd:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And I think, yeah, there's going to be some things that stick in a good way, you know? Because hopefully, we're going to soon get back to a time when we're picking what things we want to continue doing, versus being forced to do things that we weren't as comfortable with, perhaps, at the beginning. But gosh, I think we've all gotten a lot more adept at certain things, just because we had to, we're not by nature. We're all very adaptable people.

Robb Boyd:

But I appreciate all the help you guys are providing, because the wealth of knowledge that you bring because of what you either already knew or you're learning from other customers, and you're able to share that in the right way so that others can accelerate their planning for whatever that eventuality is, and it's certainly different for each business and each industry. And the fact that you guys have taken a beautiful physical monument to multi-vendor solving problems with technology in your ATC, the Advanced Technology Center, don't have to go there. Didn't have to before this all started. You guys were on the virtual path well before this. And so now, it's really paying off that you were doing that, but so I'm glad that you're all able to still keep moving, moving and shaking.

Robb Boyd:

Anyway. Well, thank you guys. I certainly appreciate your time to shed light on this. Each one of you appears in various resources that again, we're going to encourage everybody to go, wwt.com. Be sure and look for the business continuity resources. They specifically have this talk series that I highly recommend that you check out, where there's a lot more depth in individual areas based on industry, or based on a certain problem, or things like this, and you can do all that without having to necessarily engage with somebody. But I highly also encourage you guys to register on the platform, so that you can be made aware of more resources as they become available. Look at the papers, interact, and just have a presence there, because it's a community, and that's the way it really should be thought of as well.

Robb Boyd:

Well, guys, thank you so much. Appreciate your time. Thank you for watching today, guys. This has been TEC37, your source for technology education and collaboration, from World Wide Technology. My name is Robb Boyd. Thank you so much.

 

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